Description

Overview

This project addresses the problems encountered by Leaving Cert Music students who are trying to work creatively under exam conditions, without the aid of any musical instrument. It shows how: a. to continue a given opening to complete a 16-bar melody with modulation. b. to cope with parameters such as a dance style, metre or form and c. to set a text to music. An ability to read and hear notated music does not come naturally to everyone. However, students can work towards aural competence in this area by working through the interactive examples. These allow an exploration of essential elements such as tonality, cadences and awkward intervals. The ranges of the instruments for which these melodies are written are illustrated visually and aurally with MIDI and notation files.

What You Need

A plug-in called Scorch (downloadable free from www.sibelius.com) enables the user to work through the notated examples at his/her own pace. A printer and computer speakers or headphones are also needed. If there is only one computer in the music room a multimedia projector is useful This package acts as a resource for teachers to compliment classroom lessons. It is also geared towards students who wish to work at their own pace at home. At least six forty-minute classes are needed to cover the project when it is being used as a revision tool.

Curriculum Addressed

This unit deals with the Composition strand of the Leaving Cert Music courseIt is aimed at Higher level and Ordinary level students. – Students achieve transferable knowledge in the areas of tonality, rhythm, cadences, phrasing, structure and instrumental ranges. – Notated music, often a stumbling block for those who are unable to hear what they see written down, becomes accessible, through the use of the Scorch tool. – Compositional devices can be tackled as the emphasis is gradually shifted from the ‘nuts and bolts’ of music theory to the more interesting, creative aspects of the topic

Objectives

Students can work towards aural competence in this area by working through the interactive examples. These allow an exploration of essential elements such as tonality, cadences and awkward intervals. The ranges of the instruments for which these melodies are written are illustrated visually and aurally with MIDI and notation files.

 

Author: Anna-Marie Higgins
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